Lai Mohammed, I want you to shout, speak as information points-man, tell us what govt is doing, that all will be well, give us fact based, time set goals…

Outgoing CIA boss Brennan had some sharp criticism and warnings for Trump, saying the incoming president doesn’t have “full understanding” of Russia

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Two of the top national security figures in US president-elect Donald Trump’s incoming administration broke with their soon-to-be boss on Thursday.

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President Alassane Ouattara of Cote d’Ivoire issued three decrees late on Monday  firing military and police chiefs to appease restive soldiers.

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Democrats have called on the Justice Dept & Office of Government Ethics to review Trump’s appointment of his son-in-law, Jared Kushner as top adviser.

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 A White House Vigil is slated for tomorrow in Washington, the last for the Obama administration, on the 1000-Day Anniversary of kidnap of Chibok Girls.

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Gambia: Jammeh goes to court again With less than a week to the end of the tenure of President Yahya Jammeh, of Gambia, he has put in motion another ploy to extend his stay. This time, his political party has filed a request  with the Supreme Court for an injunction aimed at blocking the swearing in of his rival, Adama Barrow,  who won the 1 December election. The petition was filed on Thursday. Supreme Court Chief Justice Emmanuel Fagbenle, confirmed receipt of the petition, which was filed by Jammeh’s Alliance for Patriotic Reorientation and Construction (APRC). “It is filed today with the court registrar,” said Fagbenle, who did not say when a decision on the petition might be made. Barrow, who won the poll and has received the support of the international community, has said he will go ahead with his inauguration on Jan. 19 despite Jammeh’s rejection of the result. Aziz Bensouda, the secretary general of the Gambia Bar Association, said an injunction would be unconstitutional. “The inauguration of the president-elect should be held when Jammeh’s term officially ends. The court does not have any mandate to put an inauguration on hold,” he said. The election defeat of Jammeh, a former coup leader, after 22 years of increasingly authoritarian rule was celebrated across the tiny West African nation, and the incumbent initially accepted the result. However, in a U-turn a week later that drew international condemnation, he denounced what he claimed was widespread fraud. The APRC filed a challenge to the poll results, but the Supreme Court was unable to hear the petition on Tuesday after several judges failed to show up. Fagbenle adjourned the hearing until Jan. 16. The Supreme Court, which rights campaigners say is heavily influenced by Jammeh, has not sat in over a year. Two chief justices have been dismissed since 2013. One of them was jailed. The court hired four foreign judges from Nigeria and Sierra Leone to hear Jammeh’s appeal. Legal sources said this week that the judges had not yet arrived in Gambia. Regional bloc ECOWAS has sought to negotiate Jammeh’s peaceful departure and Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari is leading a mediation mission to Gambia today. On Thursday, Nigeria’s lower house of parliament approved a motion to authorise Buhari to offer Jammeh asylum if he steps down. However, ECOWAS has also hinted at possible military action if he stays beyond the end of his term in office next week, raising the prospect of violence. The U.S. Department of State, which has already advised against travel to Gambia, warned American citizens on Thursday to avoid the capital Banjul’s city centre. Embassy staff were required to be off the streets by 6 p.m. (1800 GMT) until further notice. The question of whether Gambia can install opposition figure Adama Barrow as president is seen as a test case for African democracy.With less than a week to the end of the tenure of President Yahya Jammeh of Gambia, the President has again put in motion another ploy to extend his stay. Gambia: Jammeh goes to court again ahead Jan 71 handover With less than a week to the end of the tenure of President Yahya Jammeh of Gambia, he has put in motion another ploy to extend his stay. This time, his political party has filed a request  with the Supreme Court for an injunction aimed at blocking the swearing in of his rival, Adama Barrow,  who won the 1 December election. The petition was filed on Thursday. Supreme Court Chief Justice Emmanuel Fagbenle, confirmed receipt of the petition, which was filed by Jammeh’s Alliance for Patriotic Reorientation and Construction (APRC). “It is filed today with the court registrar,” said Fagbenle, who did not say when a decision on the petition might be made. Barrow, who won the poll and has received the support of the international community, has said he will go ahead with his inauguration on Jan. 19 despite Jammeh’s rejection of the result. Aziz Bensouda, the secretary general of the Gambia Bar Association, said an injunction would be unconstitutional. “The inauguration of the president-elect should be held when Jammeh’s term officially ends. The court does not have any mandate to put an inauguration on hold,” he said. The election defeat of Jammeh, a former coup leader, after 22 years of increasingly authoritarian rule was celebrated across the tiny West African nation, and the incumbent initially accepted the result. However, in a U-turn a week later that drew international condemnation, he denounced what he claimed was widespread fraud. The APRC filed a challenge to the poll results, but the Supreme Court was unable to hear the petition on Tuesday after several judges failed to show up. Fagbenle adjourned the hearing until Jan. 16. The Supreme Court, which rights campaigners say is heavily influenced by Jammeh, has not sat in over a year. Two chief justices have been dismissed since 2013. One of them was jailed. The court hired four foreign judges from Nigeria and Sierra Leone to hear Jammeh’s appeal. Legal sources said this week that the judges had not yet arrived in Gambia. Regional bloc ECOWAS has sought to negotiate Jammeh’s peaceful departure and Nigeria’s President Muhammadu Buhari is leading a mediation mission to Gambia today. On Thursday, Nigeria’s lower house of parliament approved a motion to authorise Buhari to offer Jammeh asylum if he steps down. However, ECOWAS has also hinted at possible military action if he stays beyond the end of his term in office next week, raising the prospect of violence. The U.S. Department of State, which has already advised against travel to Gambia, warned American citizens on Thursday to avoid the capital Banjul’s city centre. Embassy staff were required to be off the streets by 6 p.m. (1800 GMT) until further notice. The question of whether Gambia can install opposition figure Adama Barrow as president is seen as a test case for African democracy.

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