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Where Is Nnamdi Kanu; is he Eating Anything?

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The better question might be where are Nigerians especially Nigeria editors in print, radio, television and Internet Services. Where are other Nigerians in legal, political and social media? Where are Nigerians as Mr. Nnamdi Kanu languishes in police custody? 

Does he eat (he had said that he would not eat federal government food)? Does he have access to attorneys? Is he healthy? Does his family have access to him? Do his employers have access? Is he in President Muhammadu’s Archipelago? Where are the internet warriors of yore? Or of now?

So many questions. So few answers

1.   First they came for the AIT TV and denied them access, and I did not speak out— because I was not a public television reporter.

2.   Then they came to dump terrorist in SE/SS, and I did not speak out— because I was not living in SE/SS.

3.   Then they came for the Indigenous People of Biafra Movement (IPOBM), and I did not speak out— because I was not a person of Biafra.

4.   Then they came for MASSOB members, and I did not speak out— because I was not into MASSOB business.

5.   Then they came for the Radio Biafra, to shut it down and suppress its voice and I did not speak out— because I was in print and in internet and on TV not in radio,

6.   Then they came for Nnamdi Kanu, and I did not speak out— because I was not into Radio Biafra or any Biafran business.

7.   Then they came and arrested those demonstrating against the arrest of the editor Nnamdi Kanu and I did not speak out— because I was not an editor and did not believe in the gospel.

8.     Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

This is how these kinds of events start; very gradually and then grow. Those of us who were old enough in 1967 can see similarities: street demonstrations in Enugu, PH, Aba, Calabar, Onitsha, etc. in what is now SE/SS. 

Does PMB remember? Is he encouraging it? Does he want to re-fight this ancient war in the belief that he would get to the Final Solution?

Only the future will tell…

Benjamin Obiajulu Aduba, Boston, Massachusetts

 

Martin Niemöller, a prominent Protestant pastor who opposed the Nazi regime. He spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps. Germany, 1937.Here is Niemoller’s Original:

Martin Niemöller: “First they came for the Socialists…”

Niemöller is perhaps best remembered for the quotation:

First they came for the Socialists, and I did not speak out—

Because I was not a Socialist.

Then they came for the Trade Unionists, and I did not speak out— 

Because I was not a Trade Unionist.

Then they came for the Jews, and I did not speak out— 

Because I was not a Jew.

Then they came for me—and there was no one left to speak for me.

The quotation stems from Niemöller’s lectures during the early postwar period. Different versions of the quotation exist. These can be attributed to the fact that Niemöller spoke extemporaneously and in a number of settings. Much controversy surrounds the content of the poem as it has been printed in varying forms, referring to diverse groups such as Catholics, Jehovah’s Witnesses, Jews, Trade Unionists, or Communists depending upon the version. Nonetheless his point was that Germans—in particular, he believed, the leaders of the Protestant churches—had been complicit through their silence in the Nazi imprisonment, persecution, and murder of millions of people.

Only in 1963, in a West German television interview, did Niemöller acknowledge and make a statement of regret about his own antisemitism (see Gerlach, 2000, p. 47). Nonetheless, Martin Niemöller was one of the earliest Germans to talk publicly about broader complicity in the Holocaust and guilt for what had happened to the Jews. In his book Über die deutsche Schuld, Not und Hoffnung (published in English as Of Guilt and Hope)—which appeared in January 1946—Niemöller wrote: “Thus, whenever I chance to meet a Jew known to me before, then, as a Christian, I cannot but tell him: ‘Dear Friend, I stand in front of you, but we can not get together, for there is guilt between us. I have sinned and my people has sinned against thy people and against thyself.'”

 Martin Niemöller, a prominent Protestant pastor who opposed the Nazi regime. He spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps. Germany, 1937.

Martin Niemöller, a prominent Protestant pastor who opposed the Nazi regime. He spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps. Germany, 1937.

Martin Niemöller (1892–1984) was a prominent Protestant pastor who emerged as an outspoken public foe of Adolf Hitler and spent the last seven years of Nazi rule in concentration camps. 


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